IDOGAWA Yutaka 
井戸川豊 (1964- )

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Tokyo University certainly can be seen as the epicenter of modern Japanese ceramics. KATO Hajime 加藤土師萌 (Living National Treasure, 1900-1968), TAMURA Koichi 田村耕一 (Living National Treasure, 1918-1987), FUJIMOTO Nodo 藤本能道 (1919-1992), and MIURA Koheiji 三浦小平二 (Living National Treasure, 1933- 2006), are just a few of the great artists who have come from the university to have a major impact on Japanese art. 
These great masters passed the torch to younger generations of artists, and Idogawa is one of the great examples. Extensive training in metal, lacquer, and textiles left Idogawa well prepared for the ceramic arts. His approach combines many of these other skills, resulting in a unique blend of aesthetic principles. The Seto porcelain he prefers is a soft ivory color and melts ever so slightly during high firing, creating soft, supple surfaces for his inventive surface paintings. 
These great masters passed the torch to younger generations of artists, and Idogawa is one of the great examples. Extensive training in metal, lacquer, and textiles left Idogawa well prepared for the ceramic arts. His approach combines many of these other skills, resulting in a unique blend of aesthetic principles. The Seto porcelain he prefers is a soft ivory color and melts ever so slightly during high firing, creating soft, supple surfaces for his inventive surface paintings.

Unique among potters, Idogawa uses silver and platinum enamels on porcelain, firing in a gas kiln up to four times. In these work, the over-glazed blue turns into a deep and mysterious autumn sky, from which a silvery crescent moon shines. Below, a forest of cedar trees is showered in silvery moonlight. 
This piece brings to mind the French painter Henri Rousseau's The Sleeping Gypsy (1897), currently in the collection of New York's Museum of Modern Art. In both pieces, the midnight sky seems to cast a magic spell over the landscape, inviting the viewer to supply an imagined narrative. Idogawa works without drawing or drafting on his pots-his works are spontaneous, elegant, and free-spirited.

Idogawa was born in Tokyo in 1964 and studied under Miura Koheiji 三浦小平二 (Living National Treasure 1933-2006) and ASANO Akira 浅野陽 (1923-1997) at the Tokyo University of Art in 1991. He built his own kiln in Chiba in 2000, and since then has garnered much acclaim. He has won awards at the Japan Kogei Association Competition in 2006 and the East Japan Kogei Exhibition in 2008, and received the Takamatsunomiya Award at the 62nd Japan Kogei Exhibition in 2015, with his piece illustrated on the cover of the exhibition catalogue. He currently teaches at Hiroshima University and continues to create beautiful works of ceramic art.

IDOGAWA Yutaka 井戸川豊(1964- )
Incense Burner 銀泥彩磁 月下森林文香炉
H4.9" x D4.5" x W4.8", H12.6 x D11.6 x W12.4cm
Porcelain
Signed i at the back
With Signed Wood Box


Incense Burner, round 銀泥彩磁 月下森林文香炉
H5.5" x Dia4.8", H14 x Dia12.3cm
Porcelain
Signed i at the back
With Signed Wood Box